Devon Contract Waste supports life-saving service across Devon

A uniformed trustee of Devon Freewheelers shakes hands with Devon Contract Waste MD Simon Almond in front of a Freewheeler motorcycle and DCW car

Exeter-based waste management company Devon Contract Waste has donated £3500 to Devon Freewheelers, a life-saving charity providing voluntary out of hours transport for blood and medical supplies across Devon.

The donation could provide enough fuel to cover 49,000 miles of life-saving journeys around Devon or 14 sets of replacement tyres to maintain the road safety of the motorcycle fleet; both essential contributions to the charity’s running costs, which reach £150,000 per year.

Simon Almond, Managing Director at Devon Contract Waste, commented: “We are proud to support a number of local charities and help the Devon community.  Devon Freewheelers provides an indispensable service to our local NHS that simply could not operate without donations and I’m delighted that our donation will help them to travel many crucial miles.”

Russell Roe, Trustee and Treasurer at Devon Freewheelers commented: “Our dedicated team of volunteers carried out more than 1400 life saving journeys in 2016 and have already ridden nearly 300 trips this year. Without the support of the community, the out of hours movement of urgent blood samples and whole blood, breast milk, medication and other supplies would be slowed down significantly. The generous donation from Devon Contract Waste is a tremendous gift which will contribute to the running of our fleet and ensure that our volunteers can continue to deliver our service across Devon.”

Devon Contract Waste is a leading provider of commercial waste management services in Devon and bordering areas of Cornwall and Somerset. The company collects mixed waste from its clients in a single vehicle, reducing the number of journeys made and minimising its CO2 emissions. Each time a bin is emptied, around 3.04kg of CO2 is emitted, so collecting waste in a single bin rather than separating it into different containers also reduces CO2 emissions.

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